500 Days Of Rage And Repression In Egypt

Five hundred days ago today, on July 3 the then head of the armed forces, now president, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi took power in Egypt. The coup displaced Mohammed Morsi, who had won Egypt’s first competitive and credible elections one year earlier, in 2012.

The defining event of the early period of Sisi’s rule was the Rabaa Massacre on August 14, in which at least 817 people were killed according to Human Rights Watch. Other estimates reached much higher and even HRW noted that the number likely exceed 1000, comparing the event to other historical massacres such as Tianamen Square. In the first part of the video below survivor Mahmoud Bondok recounts his experiences:

In addition to Bondok, ImportantCool spoke to Neil Ketchley, a fellow at Oxford University  and Mohamed Elmasry Visiting Scholar at the University of Denver to try and understand what’s been happening in Egypt during the now 500-day-old Sisi era.

Who Are the Anti-Coup Protesters? And Who Are the Muslim Brotherhood?


While the deposed president may have been from the Muslim Brotherhood, the anti-coup protest movement is broader than that.

What is the State of the Egyptian Economy? How do Sisi’s and Morsi’s Approaches Differ?


What little hope the poor had under Morsi seems to be evaporating under Sisi. Below, compare the different answers the two men gave when asked what their plans would be for Egypt’s unemployed.

How have Egypt’s women fared under the Morsi and Sisi governments?


While Morsi’s rule may not have delivered the advances in women’s rights that some had hoped for, under Sisi they have become targets of unprecedented aggression.

What’s Happening in Sinai?


The restive Sinai Peninsula has long had strained relations with the Egyptian central government. These seem to be coming to a dangerous head as the Egyptian military cracks down on entire civilian populations in its quest to track down Islamists and close the tunnels into Gaza.

What do You Think of the International Media’s Coverage of Post-Coup Egypt?


The cameras that put Tahrir Square on the center of the world stage have not followed Egypt’s protesters into the junta’s dungeons.
It goes to show how the mainstream media will avoid covering the crimes of Western governments’ allies such as the Egyptian military. Help us stand with the oppressed by becoming a patron of ImportantCool or donating your twitter account.

Artefacts

(November 15, 2014)
Summary: Mohamed Elmasry Interviewed About Post Coup Egypt by Austin Mackell for ImportantCool as part of the story 500 Days Of Rage And Repression in Egypt For the full story click here. Related Comments commentsImportant Cool
Keywords: Egypt, Jan25, Morsi, Revolution, Sisi
Categories: AGM15NOV2014, AGM25Jan2015
(November 15, 2014)
Summary: Mahmoud Bondok is a survivor of the brutal massacre at the protest camp outside Rabaa Al Adawiya.  The camp was full of supporters of Egypt’s first fairly elected  President, the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohammed Morsi, whose presidency had been declared illegitimate by the then head of the Armed Forces, now president, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. Bondok (@mamzbondok […]
Keywords: Egypt, Jan25, Morsi, Revolution, Sisi
Categories: AGM15NOV2014, AGM25Jan2015
(November 15, 2014)
Summary: Neil Ketchley Interviewed About Post Coup Egypt by Austin Mackell for ImportantCool Click here for the full story. Related Comments commentsImportant Cool
Keywords: Egypt, Jan25, Morsi, Revolution, Sisi
Categories: AGM15NOV2014, AGM25Jan2015

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Austin is an Australian cross-platform journalist who began his career in Beirut during the 2006 Israeli invasion of Lebanon. He worked in the region for a total of four years, for outlets like The Diplomat, CBC, CBS, ABC (America), ABC (Australia), as well as independent and community outlets. He covered events such as the turbulent 2009 Iranian presidential elections and the unrest in Egypt during 2011 and 2012. Mackell broke news of the arrest of Egyptian Alber Saber, an atheist arrested on blasphemy charges. His work in Egypt also included investigations into army deserters and worker-led dissent leading to his arrest and charges of incitement filed against him in 2012. Austin was also one of the earliest and most vociferous of the voices warning against a military coup of 2013, by which stage he had moved to Ecuador and begun work on founding ImportantCool.

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